Latest News

Interim executive director named for business incubator center

MikeSalvador.jpg
IgniteHQ and University develop stronger ties to help area entrepreneurs and early-stage businesses
 
KENNESAW, Ga. (June 27, 2016)Michael Salvador, director of executive education programs for the Michael J. Coles College of Business, has been named the interim executive director of IgniteHQ, a business incubator, accelerator and education partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Cobb Chamber of Commerce, effective immediately. Salvador will hold dual appointments until a permanent executive director is named.
 
Salvador, who joined Kennesaw State in 2005, replaces Nancy Whatley who led IgniteHQ since it launched in March 2015. Whatley has joined TRC Staffing Services as the national vice president of franchise operations.
 
“Nancy has done a wonderful job during this startup phase of Ignite HQ; we appreciate her leadership and wish her much success,” Kennesaw State Interim President Houston Davis said. “Through Mike’s appointment, we will develop stronger ties between IgniteHQ and the Coles College of Business, particularly the College’s Entrepreneurship Center, as we continue to build a premier innovation center that will serve as an economic engine for our region and the state of Georgia.”
 
A partnership between Kennesaw State and the Cobb Chamber of Commerce and supported by Cobb County, IgniteHQ is an outgrowth of the Chamber’s Competitive EDGE program.  It supports Georgia’s entrepreneur community by identifying, developing, and providing the resources startups and new and early-stage businesses need to grow and succeed. It also provides entrepreneurs space to conduct their business, access to unique programming, mentoring and advisory services and collaboration opportunities.
 
According to Davis, IgniteHQ is in line with a strategic imperative the Board of Regents has for all University System of Georgia institutions, focusing on economic development and world-class research. In addition to the Coles College, the University’s Division of Economic Development and Community Engagement also will play an integral role and will serve as a gateway for bringing together IgniteHQ and the University’s resources with Georgia’s entrepreneur community.
 
Earlier this month, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on behalf of Kennesaw State approved the lease of a warehouse facility in downtown Marietta, which will serve as the headquarters for IgniteHQ.
 
###
 
Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

Dr. Betty L. Siegel Student Recreation and Activities Center earns accolades

Kennesaw State University's Dr. Betty L. Siegel Student Recreation and Activities Center

Architectural and interior design awards recognize facility’s form and function

KENNESAW, Ga.  (June 22, 2016) — The soaring, angular architecture and park-like atmosphere inside the Dr. Betty L. Siegel Student Recreation and Activities Center helped the $38.7 million facility win an Outstanding Sports Facility Award at the 67th NIRSA Annual Conference & Recreational Sports Expo held recently in Kissimmee, Fla. The Center also received a Bronze Citation from the 2016 Educational Interiors Showcase, administered by the American School & University magazine and SchoolDesigns.com. 

The NIRSA judges noted the Center’s exterior, whose “west façade is composed of multiple pods topped with canted roof elements which cascade like a runner in motion,” according to the award description. “Each pod is composed of angled glass, which offers full transparency to the activities within, as well as brick and stone, which anchor the design to the campus fabric.”

The NIRSA award recognizes outstanding outdoor sports facilities opened between 2013 and 2015 that demonstrate “excellence in newly constructed, renovated or expanded recreational sports facilities at NIRSA member institutions.”

In recognizing the Center with a Bronze Citation, the 2016 Educational Interiors Showcase took note of the “great use of recycled materials,” which included cabinetry and tables fashioned from oak trees felled to make way for the construction. Judges with the American School & University competition termed the overall look of the interior a “beautiful transformation.”

“We are pleased that NIRSA and the 2016 Educational Interiors Showcase have chosen to honor the Dr. Betty L. Siegel Student Recreation and Activities Center with these two awards,” said Kennesaw State’s Vice President for Student Affairs Kathleen “K.C.” White. “The Center is among the best in the country and provides our students with a wide range of health, recreation, sports and fitness options from which to choose.”

Hughes Group Architects provided the concept for the building design; Cooper Carry is the architect of record. The construction firm on the project was DPR Hardin Construction.

Interior architectural descriptions highlight the facility’s abundant natural lighting, live plants, wood benches and natural stone that create a park-like atmosphere.

Completed in 2015, the Center is more than three times the size of Kennesaw State’s original student recreation building, which was opened in 2005. During construction, some 127,217 square feet of new space was added and another 47,175 square feet was renovated. The bi-level facility contains the latest, state-of-the-art exercise and fitness equipment.

The Center has two swimming pools, one indoors for competitive swimming and another outdoors for social and leisure opportunities. Adjacent to the indoor pool is a 47-foot rock-climbing tower. In addition to an outdoor basketball court and four indoor courts, the Center has three racquetball courts, a multi-sport MAC Gym, eight outdoor tennis courts, two sand volleyball areas, a bike shop, weight and fitness areas with state-of-the-art fitness equipment and an indoor walk/jog/run track.

Situated across from the James V. Carmichael Student Center, the Center is one of the first buildings students see upon entering the Kennesaw Campus.  A familiar place for students to participate in programs such as outdoor adventures, OwlFit, intramural sports, club sports, aquatics, and wellness.

###

 

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.                                                                               

— Robert S. Godlewski

Kennesaw State finance executive among first university business fellows

DawnGamadamis.jpg

National Association of College and University Business Officers selects Dawn Gamadanis

KENNESAW, Ga. (June 21, 2016) — A Kennesaw State University executive has been selected as one of 15 aspiring chief college and university business officers nationwide to participate in the National Association of College and University Business Officers’ inaugural leadership development fellowship program.

As a NACUBO fellow, Dawn Gamadanis, assistant vice president for financial management, will spend one year working with higher education presidents, provosts, and seasoned chief business officers to deepen her knowledge of university business management, institutional communications and the expanding role of the CBO on campus.

“I am very passionate about the future of higher education and its role in preparing our leaders of tomorrow,” said Gamadanis, who oversees a university budget of $512 million and a team of over 80 employees. “The NACUBO plays an important role in shaping that future. Its Fellows Program provides an invaluable growth opportunity for me to strengthen my leadership skills, network with similarly experienced individuals and gain additional insights into the challenges and opportunities facing CBOs today. The experience will allow me to ‘pay it forward’ to faculty, staff and students.”   

Gamadanis, a Kennesaw State alumna, earned an MBA and an undergraduate degree in business administration. In addition to her primary role in the University’s administration, she serves as a member of Kennesaw State’s Strategic Thinking and Planning Committee, which is developing the university’s 2017-2022 Strategic Plan. 

NACUBO officials say the fellowship program is launching as higher education faces complex issues on many fronts. They cited an evolution in the nation’s student population, the adoption of new tuition strategies, lower college and university endowment returns at many institutions and the anticipated retirement of many current chief business officers.

“It is critical that we prepare key talent to lead our industry into the future,” said Marta Perez Drake, NACUBO's vice president of professional development. “The Fellows represent the best of the sector’s talent pipeline, and we look forward to helping them grow as higher education business professionals.”

The NACUBO Fellows Program will formally kick off during a workshop preceding the NACUBO 2016 Annual Meeting in Montréal this summer.

###

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country. 

About NACUBO
NACUBO, founded in 1962, is a nonprofit professional organization representing chief administrative and financial officers at more than 2,100 colleges and universities across the country. NACUBO's mission is to advance the economic viability, business practices and support for higher education institutions in fulfillment of their missions. For more information, visit www.nacubo.org.

 

 

 

Second cohort of Woodrow Wilson teaching fellows at Kennesaw State University announced

Woodrow Wilson Foundation Fellows 2016.jpg

Bagwell College of Education, in partnership with the College of Science and Mathematics, continues to provide STEM teachers for Georgia’s high-need schools

KENNESAW, Ga. (June 9, 2016) — At the state capitol June 1, Gov. Nathan Deal announced the second class of Woodrow Wilson Georgia Teaching Fellows, a program designed to close the achievement gap and provide all students with high-quality teachers.

The highly competitive program recruits recent graduates and career changers with strong backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and math – the STEM fields – and prepares them to teach in high-need secondary schools.

“The Woodrow Wilson Fellowship is about putting well-trained, committed educators in not only the fields of highest demand in our technology-driven age, but in the schools of highest need here in Georgia,” Deal said. “STEM education plays a critical role in our state’s competitiveness and future economic prosperity and the most important thing we can do for our students in this field is ensure they have effective teachers. This opportunity for teachers is leading to a brighter future for students as they prepare for the 21st century workforce.”

Sixty individuals are part of the second cohort, which is offered at Kennesaw State University, Columbus State University, Georgia State University, Mercer University and Piedmont College during the 2016 – 2017 academic year.

Kennesaw State fellows include:

·               Tammy Borngessser

·               KyleLanrewski

·               Marshai Waiters

·               Michael Sanderson

·               Lily Appleton

·               Kendall Schlundt

·               Michael Fusia

·               Natasakia Wayne

·               Wesley Queen

·               Ruth Richir 

·               Savannah Bell

·               Amanda Barrett

“Our second cohort will add four new math teachers, one new chemistry teacher, five new biology teachers and two new physics teachers, where there is a critical shortage,” said Desha Williams, project director.

Each fellow receives $30,000 to complete a specially designed, cutting-edge master’s degree program based on a yearlong classroom experience. In return, fellows commit to teach for three years in the urban and rural Georgia schools that most need strong STEM teachers. Throughout the three-year commitment, fellows receive ongoing support and mentoring.

The university partners, selected in a statewide review by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, have spent the past year and a half tailoring their teacher preparation programs to meet the fellowship’s standards for intensive clinical work and rigorous related coursework. All five participating universities received $400,000 matching grants to develop their teacher preparation programs based on standards set by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. For each of the program’s three years, the participating Georgia colleges and universities will be able to enroll 12 fellows, totaling 180 fellows over that three-year period.

“Under Governor Deal’s leadership, Georgia has demonstrated a strong commitment to identifying, recruiting and preparing top candidates for STEM teaching careers throughout the state,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. “Across the nation, we hear of struggles to get exemplary teachers, particularly those who teach subjects like science and math, to serve in high-need schools. Through the hard work of the governor, the legislature, partner universities, and local school districts, we are working together to ensure Georgia’s urban and rural communities have the strong teachers our children need to learn and succeed in the 21st century. Together, we are committed to meeting the staffing needs of Georgia’s high-need schools."

###

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation (www.woodrow.org) identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

 

New grants allow Kennesaw State’s addiction and recovery center to expand services

CYAAR's Teresea Johnston.jpg

Students with eating disorders and Cobb County high school students to benefit

KENNESAW, Ga. (June 8, 2016)— Kennesaw State University’s Center for Young Adult Addiction and Recovery (CYAAR) has been awarded two new grants that will expand its services to a growing number of students suffering from eating disorders and to help stem the growing use of drugs and alcohol among Cobb County high school students.

Under a $40,000 Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategies (BRSS TACS) contract awarded by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the CYAAR will partner with local nonprofit Supporting Others to Achieve Recovery (SOAR) and its transitional living home — The Phoenix House — to increase awareness at Kennesaw State about eating disorders. The funding also will allow the Center to provide peer support and help reduce the stigma associated with the disorder.

A $10,000 Cobb Community Impact Grant will bring the Center’s peer education and recovery education programs to more than 3,000 Cobb County juniors and seniors. They will evaluate their perceptions and risks related to substance use, misuse and dependence and learn from peer educators in successful recovery.

“There is compelling data indicating a need for CYAAR to expand its services in these critical areas,” said Teresa Johnston, the Center’s founding director. “We have recently seen an increase in the number of Kennesaw State students seeking recovery support for eating disorders as a primary concern, as well as those in recovery from substance use disorders and co-occurring mental health concerns.”

Johnston noted that during the 2014-2015 academic year, Kennesaw State’s Counseling and Psychological Services department treated 59 Kennesaw State students for eating disorder-related conditions. In fall 2015 alone, 37 students identifying an “eating disorder” were treated, and that number is expected to increase through the current academic year. Also, the University’s health and wellness promotion nutritionist reported that assessments for those identifying with eating disorders doubled from fall 2014 to fall 2015 and the number of follow-up appointments for those students increased dramatically as well.

“Clearly, there is a need to expand the CYAAR’s expertise and success in collegiate addition recovery supports to students with eating disorders,” Johnston said. “We can best accomplish this by working collaboratively with partners like SOAR and The Phoenix House, the only peer-based residential facility in the country for women with eating disorders. By combining resources to support Kennesaw State students seeking help for eating disorders, we hope to lead the way in helping others understand that recovery requires addressing mental health disorders as well as addictive disorders.”   

When it comes to CYAAR’s expansion of services to adolescents, Johnston said the experience in Georgia reflects a national trend towards higher levels of drug use among teenagers.

“We know that in 2012, half of the 2.8 million new users of illicit drugs were under age 18, and in Georgia, almost one of every five youth ages 12 to 17 has used an illicit drug,” Johnston said. “We also know that the majority of substance use and misuse does not begin in college. Last year, three-fourths of college drinkers and drug users reported that they began using in high school or earlier.” 

The community impact grant allows the CYAAR to heighten awareness about the risk of addiction among Cobb County youth, and to help educate students in Georgia’s second-largest school system about addiction and recovery, Johnston said. The program also will result in the analysis of baseline data showing the effectiveness of risk perception education and the impact of peer education provided by college students for those in high school. 

Since 2007, the CYAARhas provided prevention/education to more than 5,000 Kennesaw State students and recovery support services to an average of 1,000 students per year. One of the first collegiate recovery programs of its kind,the Center serves an average of 80 recovering students annually.  

###

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country. 

Kennesaw State math educator selected a 2016 Governor’s Teaching Fellow

callahan.jpg

Associate Professor of Mathematics Education Kadian Callahan one of 15 named across Georgia

KENNESAW, Ga.  (June 8, 2016) — Kennesaw State University Associate Professor of Mathematics Education Kadian Callahan has been selected as a 2016 Governor’s Teaching Fellow. As one of 15 faculty members from institutions of higher education across the state, Callahan was named after a highly competitive application and selection process.

For the past year and a half, Callahan has also served as Faculty Fellow for Teaching and Learning Innovation in the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL). In her CETL role, Callahan provides coaching support for faculty seeking to enhance teaching and learning in their courses. CETL’s mission is to promote research-based pedagogies that foster student academic engagement, learning and success.

The Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program was established in 1995 by Gov. Zell Miller to provide Georgia’s higher education faculty with expanded opportunities for developing important teaching skills. Miller envisioned that this program would address faculty members’ pressing need to use emerging technologies and instructional tools that are becoming increasingly important for learning in today’s society.

The Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program is an outreach program of the Institute of Higher Education at the University of Georgia. To improve the quality of instruction in Georgia’s colleges and universities, the Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program assumes the complex challenge of moving college faculty members to the leading edge of instructional practice. This effort to enhance instruction in public and private higher education statewide is very much in keeping with the University of Georgia’s traditional mission as a land-grant institution committed to diversified outreach and public service.

Governor's Teaching Fellows may participate in academic year symposia; an intensive summer symposium; or an academic-year residency at the University of Georgia. Past symposia have addressed numerous topics in using technology in the classroom and other pedagogical innovations.

To date, more than 89 subject areas, professions and teaching areas have been represented, and Fellows have come from more than 61 public and private institutions statewide. Click to learn more about the Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program.

###

 

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

— Robert S. Godlewski

 

Mark Tillman named dean of WellStar College of Health and Human Services

Mark Tillman

Distinguished biomechanics expert looks forward to ‘tremendous opportunity’ at Kennesaw State

KENNESAW, Ga. (June 6, 2016) — Kennesaw State University has named Mark Tillman as dean of the WellStar College of Health and Human Services, effective July 1.

Tillman currently is the dean of the College of Health and Human Services at Troy University. He was selected for his new role at Kennesaw State following a nationwide search chaired by Mark Anderson, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.

“We are thrilled to welcome Mark Tillman to Kennesaw State University. I have no doubt he will advance the WellStar College of Health and Human Services to new heights,” said Ken Harmon, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Kennesaw State. “I am confident that Dr. Tillman’s experience, vision and strong record of strategic planning will significantly enhance the College’s roles in education, innovation and community engagement.”

Tillman will succeed Monica Nandan, who has served as interim dean of the College since July 2014. Nandan will return to being a professor and the chair of the Department of Social Work and Human Services. She has served as interim dean since Richard Sowell stepped down following 13 years as dean, during which the College of Health and Human Services experienced significant growth.

Tillman previously was the interim dean and chair of Troy University’s Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion. Before joining Troy in 2013, he held faculty and administrative positions at Stetson University and the University of Florida.

In his 17 years of university service, Tillman has taught more than 10,000 undergraduate students, served on more than 100 graduate student committees, been named Teacher of the Year twice and been recognized as a Distinguished Member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. He said he looks forward to the “tremendous opportunity” that awaits him at Kennesaw State.

“I am extremely honored to have been selected to serve as the next dean of the WellStar College of Health and Human Services,” Tillman said. “I was initially attracted to KSU because of the excellent reputation of the University. After meeting with several administrators, faculty and staff, I have a better understanding of why the reputation is so strong, and I am excited to join such a dedicated team focused on innovation and growth.”

Tillman’s research is focused on lower-extremity biomechanics and biomechanics for special populations such as wheelchair users, knee-replacement patients and people with multiple sclerosis. His interdisciplinary work has resulted in 70 refereed publications, 19 funded grants and numerous scientific presentations pertaining to injury prevention and quality of life enhancement.

Tillman earned three degrees from the University of Florida: a bachelor’s degree in engineering sciences, a master’s in engineering mechanics and a Ph.D. in health and human performance with a specialization in biomechanics. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Kennesaw State University’s WellStar College of Health and Human Services offers six undergraduate and five graduate programs to more than 4,000 students. The College is composed of the WellStar School of Nursing and the departments of Exercise Science and Sport Management, Health Promotion and Physical Education and Social Work and Human Services.

###

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

 

— Paul Floeckher

Houston Davis Named Interim President of Kennesaw State University

Houston Davis.jpeg
 
ATLANTA - (May 26) - University System of Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby has named Dr. Houston Davis interim president of Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia.
 
Davis has served as executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer at the University System of Georgia since May 2012. He will assume his role on July 1 replacing Dr. Daniel Papp who is retiring as of June 30.
 
“Kennesaw State is a vital part of the University System and plays a crucial role in educating students from across the state of Georgia,” said Huckaby. “Sending our chief academic officer to lead KSU will ensure that it continues to thrive as we plan the next phase of the new KSU."
 
“I am honored to serve Kennesaw State,” said Davis. “Students are increasingly turning to KSU because of its commitment to academic excellence, innovation and global engagement. We want to build on the excellent foundation that is in place and ensure that momentum is maintained.”
 
As executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer, Davis oversees all matters related to academics and students. He leads the division of academic affairs that encompasses academic programs and policy, tenure and promotion, faculty development, intercollegiate athletics, distance education, academic and public libraries, teacher preparation, accreditation and other areas.
 
His previous positions have included serving as vice chancellor for academic affairs for the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, project director and principal investigator for the National Educational Needs Index Project, and associate vice chancellor for academic affairs for the Tennessee Board of Regents.
 
Davis was also a faculty member and administrator at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tenn., in addition to positions with the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and the University of Memphis in Tennessee.
 
Davis earned a doctor of philosophy in education and human development from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., a master’s degree in education administration from Tennessee State University in Nashville and a bachelor’s degree in political science from University of Memphis.
 
He and his wife, Jenny, have three children and reside in Roswell, Ga.
 
Information regarding a formal presidential search will be announced at a later date.
###

Nicole Junker, Kelly Dumont named Clendenin Scholars

Clendenin Scholars 2016

Two students receive annual scholarship for graduate studies at Kennesaw State

KENNESAW, Ga. (May 24, 2016) — Two Kennesaw State University students – one who aspires to end human trafficking and one who plans to help people in coping with grief – are receiving scholarships toward their altruistic career pursuits.

Nicole Junker, a Ph.D. student in international conflict management, and Kelly Dumont, a student in the Master of Social Work program, are this year’s Clendenin Scholars. The Clendenin Scholars Program awards up to $20,000 a year to high-achieving students pursuing graduate degrees at Kennesaw State.

Junker (left, in photo) completed research on human trafficking in the Republic of Moldova for her master’s thesis and currently is researching the media impact on trafficking survivors returning from Islamic State-captivity in Iraqi Kurdistan. Her dissertation addresses the importance of creating an adaptable model for the rehabilitation of sex-trafficking victims throughout the world.

Prior to joining the INCM program and becoming a graduate research assistant to professor Debarati Sen, Junker served as the communications specialist for the Access to Justice Program in Iraq and as the communications director for the Identity Theft Resource Center. She has volunteered for nearly a decade with the International Visitor Leadership Program, teaching international delegates how to create communications products involving survivors of gender-based and sexual violence and working with domestic-trafficking survivors in rehabilitation.

Dumont (right, in photo) works as a graduate research assistant at Kennesaw State and is a member of Phi Alpha Social Work Honor Society, National Association of Social Workers and Georgia Society for Clinical Social Work. While a student at Wake Forest University, Dumont founded a chapter of Actively Moving Forward, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting college students who are grieving a loved one’s illness or death.

Dumont focuses her research on the psychosocial impacts chronic illness has on individuals and families. She plans to pursue a career in medical social work, with particular interests in care coordination, community health outreach and education, and grief and bereavement counseling.

Junker will be awarded $20,000 to pursue her doctorate, while Dumont will receive $15,000 as the Clendenin Scholars master’s recipient. Both also will receive full graduate tuition waivers.

Junker, Dumont, previous scholarship recipients and the Clendenin family will be honored at a reception in the fall. A total of 40 students have received scholarships through the initiative, originally known as the Clendenin Graduate Fellows Program when it was established in 2008 with a $1 million endowment from the Clendenin family.

For more information about the Clendenin Scholars Program, visit www.kennesaw.edu/clendenin.

###

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

 

— Paul Floeckher

Electric Vehicle Team finishes first in nation at Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Kennesaw State's electric vehicle team races to first place finish at national competition

Team’s electric go-kart beats 20 others to finish first at GrandPrix

KENNESAW, Ga. (May 23, 2016) — Kennesaw State University’s Electric Vehicle Team rose to victory on the racetrack last week as the winner of the International evGrandPrix, an intercollegiate competition of electric-powered go-karts.

Kennesaw State’s team, a part of the Southern Polytechnic College of Engineering and Engineering Technology, raced past 20 other electric go-karts from colleges and universities across North America to take the top spot in the all-electric series at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Sponsored by Purdue University and the United States Auto Club (USAC), the annual race drew teams such as the University of Oklahoma, Northwestern University and the University of Windsor in Canada.  In addition to race performance, the evGrandPrix scoring is based on energy efficiency and engineering design of the lightweight vehicles.

The Kennesaw State team, founded in 2013, has been competing in the annual evGrandPrix for four years, earning sixth and eighth place in previous years. The team won this year’s race with driver Gabriel Capo, a mechanical engineering technology student.

“Race day was a roller coaster of emotions,” said Tyler Rowan, the electrical design team lead for KSU’s team. “The vehicles race at speeds of 40 to 50 miles per hour on the straightaways, and although we watched other teams crash, we had a phenomenal driver who had prior racing experience.”   

Twelve of the team’s nearly 45 members traveled to Indianapolis for the race. To develop and field their competitive electric vehicle, the team obtained funding support from the University’s alumni, Student Government Association and external sponsors.

In addition to the go-kart, the team has also developed a full-size electric vehicle, which will compete in the Formula SAE electric vehicle competition in Lincoln, Nebraska in June.

 

# # #

 

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

Syndicate content