Board of Regents

KSU 'uniquely positioned' to produce innovative entrepreneurs

Name of Publication: 
WABE 90.1 FM
Excerpt of Article: 

A new degree program will position Kennesaw State University to be a leader in producing innovative and successful entrepreneurs, Chris Hanks said Wednesday on WABE's "Closer Look" program.

"No student will enter this degree program and leave it the same," said Hanks, the executive director of the Robin and Doug Shore Entrepreneurship Center at KSU. "They will be transformed, and they will leave it a better version of themselves."

The Coles College of Business will begin the Bachelor of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship in fall 2017. It is the first entrepreneurship B.B.A. program in Georgia.

"It came about from the desire for the institution to lead entrepreneurship in the Southeast," Hanks said. "By having the only major (in Georgia), we become the destination point for anybody who is serious about entrepreneurship."

Click here to listen to the full interview

KSU to offer entrepreneurship major

Name of Publication: 
Atlanta Business Chronicle
Excerpt of Article: 

Kennesaw State University is about to launch a first for the University System of Georgia — an undergraduate degree program in entrepreneurship.

The university system’s Board of Regents voted Aug. 10 to authorize the new major at KSU’s Coles College of Business. The first classes will start during the fall semester of next year.

There are dozens of entrepreneurship degree programs across the country, led byBabson College, a small private business college in Massachusetts that has made entrepreneurship education its central focus.

But the idea of establishing an entrepreneurship major in Georgia didn’t begin to blossom until two years ago, when Robin Cheramie, then the newly installed chair of the Department of Management and Entrepreneurship at Coles, sat down to brainstorm with Christopher Hanks, executive director of The Entrepreneurship Center at KSU.

“It started as an innocent conversation on how we could bring entrepreneurship to our students,” Cheramie said.

Cheramie said the two first talked about creating some courses in entrepreneurship, then about attaching it as a minor to a related degree program. Then, Hanks suggested taking the idea full bore by making entrepreneurship a major course of study leading to a bachelor’s degree.

“We want to help students understand the realities of starting a business,” Cheramie said. “We don’t believe all our majors will go out and start a business. But they will be entrepreneurial within their companies.”

Next came the task of pitching the idea to officials at Coles and KSU, then selling it to the Board of Regents. To do that, The Entrepreneurship Center lined up testimonials from more than 60 local employers willing and eager to hire graduates coming out of the new program.

The new major will feature four core courses, including one called “The Entrepreneurial Mind.” The other core subjects will teach students how to market a new business, how to finance a startup company and how to develop a business plan.

KSU expects to have 80 students enrolled in the entrepreneurship program during its first year, most of whom will be shifting into the major from other programs at the university. But as the new major catches on, projections call for enrollment to grow to 138 students by the fourth year, the vast majority of whom will be incoming freshmen and transfers new to KSU.

“There are high school programs in entrepreneurship that are launching,” Cheramie said. “We may be seeing a funnel.”

“My guess is Kennesaw will blow this out of the water,” said Regent Rutledge Griffin Jr., a member of the board’s Academic Affairs Committee. “I think this is the beginning of something very exciting.”

Kennesaw State to offer bachelor’s degree in entrepreneurship

Coles College exterior

Coles College of Business program will be first of its kind in Georgia

KENNESAW, Ga. (Aug. 10, 2016) — The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on Wednesday approved establishing a Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Entrepreneurship at Kennesaw State University.

The new undergraduate degree program in the Michael J. Coles College of Business will begin in fall 2017. It is the first entrepreneurship B.B.A. program in Georgia.

“Offering the state’s first comprehensive degree in entrepreneurship illustrates Kennesaw State’s commitment to producing innovative graduates who are well equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge,” said Ken Harmon, the University’s provost and vice president for academic affairs. “College graduates who start new businesses have become the largest producers of private sector jobs in recent years, and this new degree is another avenue for KSU to be a leader in that trend.”

The goal of the new program is to help students develop the necessary knowledge, skills and mindset to become successful entrepreneurs. While the Coles College’s Department of Management and Entrepreneurship will house the program, the B.B.A. in Entrepreneurship will operate in multiple disciplines across other units and schools on campus and within the business community.

Through the Robin and Doug Shore Entrepreneurship Center at KSU, local entrepreneurs will serve as guest speakers and provide other opportunities to engage with students in the B.B.A. program. Also, the Cox Family Enterprise Center and Kennesaw State University Small Business Development Center will partner with the Coles College of Business to help promote entrepreneurship with students.

“We are so excited to offer Georgia’s only major in entrepreneurship at a time when the state and the region are keenly focused on economic development and creating new businesses,” said Kathy Schwaig, dean of the Michael J. Coles College of Business. “Our program will be a key focal point of those efforts as it provides education and support to aspiring entrepreneurs.”

The B.B.A. in Entrepreneurship is Kennesaw State’s latest step as part of the Board of Regents’ directive for all University System of Georgia institutions to focus on economic development and world-class research. Kennesaw State also established IgniteHQ — a business incubator, accelerator and education partnership with the Cobb Chamber of Commerce — which identifies, develops and provides the resources that start-ups and new and early-stage businesses need to succeed.

Along with Kennesaw State’s resources on campus, the University also is located in an ideal market for entrepreneurship. CNN Money ranked Atlanta as the sixth-best city to launch a start-up, and the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity identified Georgia has having the nation’s second-largest increase in entrepreneurial activity over the past decade.

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

 

— Paul Floeckher

Kennesaw State University’s economic impact exceeds $1.3 billion in fiscal year 2015

Campus Green Generic Image of Kennesaw Hall

Consolidated “New U” is fourth largest economic engine in the USG

KENNESAW, Ga. (May 19, 2016) — Kennesaw State University has become an economic juggernaut, topping $1.3 billion in economic impact in fiscal year 2015, according to the University System of Georgia’s economic impact report released May 10. The total impact of all 31 institutions on their host communities was $15.5 billion in FY 2015.

Just as students of the “New U” are benefitting from a broader selection of activities from which to choose and with which to engage, the regional economy is benefitting from the combined finances of Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

Of the FY 2015 total, $816 million is initial spending by the institutions for personnel services and operating expenses and student spending. The remaining $498 million of the output impact was created by re-spending – the multiplier effect of the dollars that are spent again in the region. On average, every dollar of initial spending generates an additional 46 cents for the economy of the region that hosts the institution.

“We’re not just bigger, we’re better as a result of consolidation,” said President Daniel S. Papp. “These numbers are a great representation of the positive impact we’re having on our students, the communities we serve and the state of Georgia. We’re proud to contribute so significantly to the economic well being of the state.”

The USG study was conducted by the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business, which analyzed data collected between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015, to calculate the university’s economic impact.

“These benefits permeate both the private and public sectors of the host communities,” said Jeffrey M. Humphreys, director of the Selig Center. “For example, for each job created on campus, there are 2.1 off-campus jobs that exist because of spending related to the college or university. These economic impacts demonstrate that continued emphasis on colleges and universities as a pillar of the state’s economy translates into jobs, higher incomes, and greater production of goods and services.”

According to the survey, the collective employment impact of all institutions on their host communities in FY 2015, including multiplier effects, is 150,191 full- and part-time jobs. Approximately 32 percent of these positions are on campus (48,785 University System employees) and 68 percent (101,406 jobs) are off-campus positions in either the private or public sectors. The 150,191 jobs generated by the University System account for 3.5 percent of all the nonfarm jobs in Georgia, or about one job in 28.

Serving more than 33,000 students, Kennesaw State University’s collective employment impact in FY 2015 was 11,608 full- and part-time jobs, including 2,724 jobs on campus, which created 8,884 jobs off-campus in either the private or public sectors.

In a nod to the University’s continued emphasis on economic growth, Papp named Charles Ross as Kennesaw State’s first vice president for economic development and community engagement. Ross serves as the University’s chief officer focused on deploying resources to aid economic development and expand relationships with off-campus communities. He also oversees and manages Kennesaw State’s Office of Community Engagement and the Office of Government Relations, as well as chairing the KSU Economic Development Task Force and serving as the University’s chief liaison to the Cobb County Chamber’s Competitive EDGE Project.

To download the USG’s full economic impact report, go to: http://www.usg.edu/assets/economic_development/documents/USG_Impact_2015...

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country. 

Kennesaw State president praises progress, looks ahead to more

KSU State of the University 2016

Papp touts work toward becoming ‘world-class institution’ in annual State of the University address

Click here for a transcript of Dr. Papp's speech.

KENNESAW, Ga. (April 26, 2016) — A great deal has been accomplished in the 15 months since the consolidation of Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University — but much more work and progress is ahead, President Daniel S. Papp told faculty and staff in his annual State of the University address.

In his speech, given on April 25 and April 26 at the Kennesaw and Marietta campuses, Papp outlined the strategic steps Kennesaw State will take in the coming year. He also shared several successes from the past year, including a record enrollment of 33,400 students, more than 5,600 students earning degrees since the consolidation, and Kennesaw State’s classification as a Carnegie doctoral research institution.

“This University is on its way to becoming exactly what the Board of Regents, the people of Georgia and we ourselves expect KSU to be — a world-class academic institution,” Papp said. “Our University, our students, our faculty and our staff are increasingly being recognized and appreciated for the high quality of everything being done at KSU.”

That includes meeting two key objectives the Regents set for the consolidation of Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State. The first is that in the current and upcoming budgets, the University is redirecting funds from administrative functions and putting them toward research, scholarship, infrastructure improvements and instruction and education — including adding more faculty members and advisors. The budget also includes no tuition increase in 2017, Papp said.

The second objective being met is Kennesaw State’s increase in the percentage of students it retains and graduates. Combining extra-curricular and co-curricular activities in the consolidation has afforded students more opportunities, according to Papp.

“New U students have a broader selection of activities from which to choose and with which to engage,” he said. “As a result, KSU’s retention, progression and graduation rates over the next few years should climb.”

As research takes on a larger role at Kennesaw State, the University could top $11 million in external research funding this year, Papp said. Fundraising also is on the rise, as two of the three largest personal gifts in KSU history have been given in the past year.

However, Papp noted, “much remains to be done so we can realize our full potential.” He outlined six major tasks the “new Kennesaw State” must complete:

• Strategic plan — A 42-person committee is in the midst of developing goals, objectives, mission statements and action steps for a five-year strategic plan to begin in 2017. The committee will gather feedback from the campus community in the fall and submit the finalized plan to the Board of Regents in December 2016.

• New master plan — “This project will envision and lay the foundation for the physical future of both KSU campuses going out as far as 2045,” Papp said. Town hall-style meetings have been held on campus, and additional ones will be scheduled prior to the plan’s completion at the end of this year.

• Branding and marketing project — Kennesaw State is teaming with a consulting firm to develop branding and marketing initiatives that will be rolled out next year. “This project will determine what the University must do to heighten local, regional and national public awareness of, and appreciation for, the new KSU,” Papp said.

• Capital campaign — A combination of those first three initiatives will help Kennesaw State plan and launch its next fundraising campaign, according to Papp. A “first-rate fundraising team” will identify the University’s greatest needs and begin the comprehensive capital campaign within the year, he said.

• Reaccreditation — Kennesaw State must submit a report in 2018 for reaccreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools — as required every 10 years — in preparation for the 2019 visit by the SACS reaccreditation team. “This might seem like it’s a long time away, but given how much work must be done, it’s not,” Papp said. Kennesaw State’s Office of Institutional Effectiveness already is compiling the report, which Papp assured “will be massive.” He added, “The report must provide detailed documentation of the extent to which KSU complies with each of the 88 items in SACS’ principles of accreditation. Many of those 88 items have multiple parts.”

• Quality Enhancement Plan — As part of the reaccreditation process, Kennesaw State must develop and submit a Quality Enhancement Plan “to create a campus-wide program that will enhance student learning,” Papp explained. The selection committee received several proposals and selected “engaging in transformative learning” as KSU’s new core QEP, he said.

“From my perspective, the good news is this — more and more students want to come to KSU,” Papp said. “In research, scholarship and creative activity, our reputation and productivity are growing.”

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

 

— Paul Floeckher

Photo by David Caselli

Board of Regents approves property purchase for Kennesaw State

Kennesaw State University

Site near Kennesaw Campus will serve a role in the University’s future growth

KENNESAW‚ Ga. (Jan. 7, 2016) — The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on Wednesday approved the purchase of property east of Kennesaw State University’s Kennesaw Campus to be utilized in KSU’s future development.

The Board of Regents will acquire 1.02 acres at 3051 George Busbee Parkway from Cobb County for $875,000. The property – formerly occupied by Kids R Kids – includes a 12,320-square-foot, one-story building and adjacent parking area. Funding for the property acquisition will come from state bonds earmarked for infrastructure expansion at Kennesaw State.

With this latest land acquisition, the University’s Kennesaw Campus will occupy a total of 384 acres, and the Marietta Campus will occupy 197 acres.

“We appreciate the Board of Regents approving this acquisition and enabling us to secure the real estate and facilities needed to meet the demands of our rapidly-growing student population,” Papp said. “Space continues to be at a premium as Kennesaw State evolves into a world-class institution, so this new property will strongly support our master plan and the vision we have for the University’s future.”

The property is located across the street from the 88-acre KSU Sports and Entertainment Park, which includes Fifth Third Bank Stadium. It is also adjacent to the land the University previously purchased at the former BrandsMart USA site on Busbee Drive in Kennesaw, which was approved by the BOR in February 2015.

The former BrandsMart building currently serves as the home of Kennesaw State’s marching band and also provides much-needed warehouse space. A master plan is currently in development for the remainder of the facility. The adjacent parking lot also provides additional parking spaces for the University’s use.

Conceptual plans for renovating the former Kids R Kids building to help meet the University’s growth demands are currently being developed and reviewed.

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering nearly 150 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 33,000 students from over 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

Board of Regents approves Master of Science in Healthcare Management and Informatics

Coles College of Business

New degree aims to produce more workers for the health IT sector

KENNESAW‚ Ga. (April 16, 2015) — Kennesaw State will offer a new Master of Science in Healthcare Management and Informatics‚ an interdisciplinary degree designed to address the growing demand within the health information technology sector.

The new degree‚ approved by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia at its April 14 meeting‚ is the only one of its kind in the system.

The curriculum will be designed to address delivery of healthcare; information technology; computing; data analytics; informatics; and leadership/management principles. Kennesaw State will offer the program beginning in fall 2016.

“Kennesaw State developed this degree because we recognize that healthcare management and informatics is one of the fastest-growing health occupations in the nation,” said Ken Harmon, provost and vice president of academic affairs. “There is a critical need for students with this skill set, and Kennesaw State will produce professionals well-equipped to lead and make a difference in the quality of the nation’s healthcare.”

As a growing area of the healthcare sector, the specialization of healthcare informatics includes a wide range of jobs involved with the collection and processing of health information to improve the quality of patient care.

The Master of Science in Healthcare Management and Informatics will provide graduates with an understanding of the complexities that must be considered when making technology and management decisions within healthcare organizations, and the key role that informatics can play in the delivery and practice of quality healthcare.

The graduate degree program spans three colleges – Coles College of Business, College of Science and Mathematics and WellStar College of Health and Human Services – and four departments – Information Systems, Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics and Nursing. The cohort program will be delivered over four semesters and will include 11 courses and a total of 36 credit hours.

“The growth in this field is exponential,” said Traci Carte, chair of the Department of Information Systems. “There are not enough people to handle the demand. The potential for our students is vast.”

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering more than 100 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive university with more than 32,000 students from 130 countries. In January 2015, Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State University consolidated to create one of the 50 largest public universities in the country.

 

 

It's Official!

BOR Consolidation Meeting dc 4 copy.jpg

KENNESAW, Ga.  (Jan. 6, 2015) — Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University will begin operating as a new consolidated Kennesaw State University following a vote Tuesday by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia during its January meeting.   

The BOR’s approval is the final step in a yearlong process to consolidate the two Cobb County-based institutions. The new Kennesaw State will operate as a fully consolidated institution when classes begin in fall 2015.

It’s official: Board of Regents approves consolidation of Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic

BOR Consolidation Meeting dc 3.jpg

New consolidated university to be fully operational in fall 2015

KENNESAW, Ga.  (Jan. 6, 2015) — Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University will begin operating as a new consolidated Kennesaw State University following a vote Tuesday by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia during its January meeting.   

The BOR’s approval is the final step in a yearlong process to consolidate the two Cobb County-based institutions. The new Kennesaw State will operate as a fully consolidated institution when classes begin in fall 2015.

“This is a historic moment for both institutions, for all the people who have worked so hard to bring consolidation about, and especially for all current and future students, faculty and staff of the new Kennesaw State,” said Daniel S. Papp, president of the consolidated University. “We are grateful that the Board has endorsed our plans for creating an exceptional university from two distinct institutions, and for combining our strengths and resources.”

University System of Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby expressed his thoughts on the consolidation of the two universities.

"Our challenge and opportunity is to control the cost of college while strengthening the quality and accessibility of the programs and degrees we offer," said Huckaby. "The new Kennesaw State University will expand opportunities for students and do so more efficiently."

The new consolidated University will maintain campuses in Kennesaw and Marietta, the current sites of Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic State, respectively. The institution will house 13 colleges:

  • Southern Polytechnic College of Engineering and Engineering Technology    
  • College of Architecture and Construction Management  
  • College of the Arts
  • College of Continuing and Professional Education
  • College of Computing and Software Engineering
  • College of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • College of Science and Mathematics
  • Leland and Clarice C. Bagwell College of Education                     
  • Michael J. Coles College of Business
  • WellStar College of Health and Human Services
  • Graduate College
  • Honors College
  • University College

With an expected student enrollment of 32,000 in fall 2015, Kennesaw State will be one of the 50 largest public universities in the country, with an economic impact of more than $1.2 billion.

The BOR’s vote to approve the consolidation came almost a month after the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) — a regional higher education accrediting body — approved a prospectus and strategic plan for the proposed consolidation. BOR approval was contingent on the SACSCOC’s approval of the plan.

Today’s vote by the BOR completes a process that began in November 2013, when the BOR recommended the consolidation of Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic. Since that time, a joint KSU-SPSU Consolidation Implementation Committee (CIC) consisting of 28 Kennesaw State and Southern Polytechnic administrators and faculty members met to plan and finalize the consolidation. The CIC relied on the work of 81 Operational Working Groups (OWGs), drawn from faculty, staff and students from both campuses, and throughout the year reviewed and approved recommendations as they came forward from the OWGs.

Prior to today’s BOR approval, the following milestones marked other key developments in the consolidation process:

On Nov. 1, 2013, University System of Georgia Chancellor Huckaby announced the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (USG) would be asked to approve the beginning of the process to consolidate Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University, with KSU President Daniel S. Papp to head the consolidated KSU.

  • On Nov. 12, 2013, the Board of Regents approved the beginning of the KSU-SPSU consolidation process.
  • On Dec. 4, 2013, the Consolidation Implementation Committee held its first meeting at the USG’s Central Office to be charged by Chancellor Huckaby.
  • On Jan. 13, 2014, the Expanded Consolidation Implementation Committee held its first meeting as the 81 Operational Work Groups were formally created.
  • On April 7, 2014, President Papp announced the leadership, college structure and administrative composition of the consolidated University.
  • On April 16, 2014, the Board of Regents approved the mission statement for the consolidated KSU.
  • On May 22, 2014, Chancellor Huckaby named SPSU Vice President for Student and Enrollment Services Ron Koger Interim President of SPSU after long-time SPSU President Lisa Rossbacher was named president of California’s Humboldt State University.
  • On Oct. 1, 2014, the Consolidated Strategic Plan and Consolidation Prospectus for the new University was submitted to the SACSCOC.
  • On Dec. 9, 2014, the SACSCOC approved the consolidation plan, leading to today’s final approval of the consolidation by the BOR.

The next several months will be consumed with completing SACSCOC requirements and finalizing operational aspects of consolidation, Papp said. “In many ways, this is only a beginning since we still have substantial work ahead of us.”  This work includes:

  • In July 2015, a detailed “Substantive Change Report” will be sent to SACSCOC.
  • In late September 2015, a SACSCOC-appointed Visitation Team will travel to Kennesaw State for several days to ensure that the consolidated university is in full accord with SACSCOC principles of accreditation following consolidation. The Visitation Team will submit a report to SACSCOC.
  • In December 2015, based on the Visitation Team report, SACSCOC will vote on the continued accreditation of the new Kennesaw State University.

The consolidation between Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University is the USG’s fifth and largest consolidation.

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Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering 100 graduate and undergraduate degrees, including doctorates in education, business and nursing and a Ph.D. in international conflict management. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive, residential institution with a growing student population of nearly 26,000 students, soon to be almost 33,000 once consolidation with Southern Polytechnic State University is finalized, from 130 countries.

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