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KSU unveils $21 million science lab

Name of Publication: 
The Marietta Daily Journal
Excerpt of Article: 

 

by Geoff Folsom
October 26, 2012 02:01 AM | 1985 views | 1 1 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The new five-story, 73,000-square-foot Science Laboratory Building.<br>Staff/Laura Moon
The new five-story, 73,000-square-foot Science Laboratory Building.
Staff/Laura Moon

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KENNESAW — In Kennesaw State University’s old science laboratories, Katie Bales and her classmates had to perform experiments on tissue in the same place other students were experimenting on bacteria — which lead to studies that weren’t the most sanitary.

“That would compromise our environment,” said Bales, a graduate molecular biology student from Villa Rica. “It would waste our time and the school’s money.”

But in the school’s new $21 million College of Science and Mathematics Science Laboratory Building, which had a ribbon-cutting Thursday morning, space isn’t a problem. The 73,000-square-foot, five-story building features six teaching labs and 17 research labs.

“It’s just having more of an area to perform our research,” Bales said. “We’re not having to run around like chickens with our heads cut off.”

Thursday’s ceremony took place in the atrium of the new building, which ties into the existing science and computer science buildings. Gary McNay, with the Perkins + Will architecture firm, said the Gold Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design building uses natural lighting and a chilled beam heating and air conditioning system. The “green” technology is intended to save $170,000 per year over a standard building.

Dr. Mark R. Anderson, dean of the 2,700-student college of science and math, said KSU has been looking to expand its science building since the 1990s but didn’t break ground on the structure until May 2011. He added that the new facility was one of the features that helped lure him from the University of Colorado Denver this summer, and he expects other faculty and prospective students to be similarly attracted.

“There’s no difference between the education you can get here and at Georgia Tech,” Anderson said. “If somebody wants to major in biology or chemistry, they would have the same opportunity here.”

The new building will be used with KSU’s two new master of science degree programs, one for integrative biology, which started this fall, and the other for chemical sciences, which starts in fall 2013.

While students won’t use the new science building for lab classes until the spring 2013 semester, some professors started performing research there a few weeks ago. Assistant biology professor Dr. Marcus Davis, who studies prehistoric fish to help find ways to prevent arthritis in humans, said he is looking forward to using the building’s new confocal microscope.

“It’s an impressive piece of equipment,” he said. “It’s something used at a major research institution. It allows us to probe deeper into cells to see how genes are developing, to ask the type of questions we couldn’t ask before.”

Dr. Jared Taglialatela, also an assistant biology professor, likes the communal atmosphere in the new building, which includes the atrium that will soon have its own coffee shop.

“It’s nice, the way it’s been done with the open space,” he said of the state-funded building. “One of the big things is to foster collaboration. To have people from different subcultures come together is going to be important moving forward.”

The school hasn’t decided what to do with the building’s fifth floor, which is vacant to be available for future expansion.

“We don’t know what our next move is, but we have the space to do it,” Davis said.

Colin King, a junior biology major from Canton, said he plans to attend medical school to learn to become a neurosurgeon after he graduates.

“This is the perfect lab for that,” he said. “This will assist in not only your research methods, but for a person with a career in neuroscience, this is as good as you can get. It’s almost cherry picked.”

KSU wants to renovate the older parts of the science building eventually, Anderson said, but the school will need to find funding.

“We would like to be an R1 (research) institution,” he said. “We’re laying the groundwork.”

The new building was built by Choate Construction of Atlanta.

Thursday’s ceremony, which took place in the building’s atrium, was also attended by KSU President Dr. Dan Papp, Cobb Commission Chairman Tim Lee, Commissioners Helen Goreham and JoAnn Birrell, and Cobb Chamber CEO David Connell. After the ceremony, dignitaries had a ribbon cutting at the base of the atrium’s staircase, which runs along a wall of glass overlooking an undeveloped courtyard.

Read more: The Marietta Daily Journal

Kennesaw State joins group to boost minority enrollment

Name of Publication: 
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Excerpt of Article: 

 

    By Laura Diamond

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    12:21 p.m. Friday, October 28, 2011

    Kennesaw State University announced Friday that it joined a statewide push to increase the number of minority students who earn degrees in math, science, technology and engineering.

    Other Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation members are: University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Georgia Perimeter College, Southern Polytechnic State, Ft. Valley State and Savannah State universities.

    The group is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and provides students with mentors, research opportunities and financial aid.

    Find this article at:

    http://www.ajc.com/news/cobb/kennesaw-state-joins-group-1212045.html

    Please see additional coverage below:

    Kennesaw State works to recruit more minority students

    Atlanta Business Chronicle by Carla Caldwell, Morning Call Editor

    Date: Monday, October 31, 2011, 7:08am EDT

    Kennesaw State Universityofficials want more minority students to attend the Cobb County, Ga., school’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs, reports the Marietta Daily Journal.

    KSU is the latest Georgia college to join the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

    Peach State LSAMP provides services including academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, research opportunities and summer bridge programs.

    There are 8,135 minorities enrolled at KSU, approximately 34 percent of the student population, the Marietta newspaper reported.

    KSU trying to recruit more minority students to science programs

    by Lindsay Field
    lfield@mdjonline.com The Marietta Daily Journal

    10.28.11 - 11:59 pm

    By Lindsay Field

    lfield@mdjonline.com

    KENNESAW — Kennesaw State University is encouraging minority students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the school, the school said Friday.

    KSU has become the most recent Georgia college to join the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

    There are 8,135 minorities enrolled at the school, approximately 34 percent of the students population.

    Peach State LSAMP provides services such as academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, research opportunities and summer bridge programs. Students at the college are recruited into the program by Dr. Army Lester and his colleagues at KSU.

    “We’ve seen the need and we’ve been addressing the need in a number of different ways over the years,” said Lester, a biology professor at KSU. “This is an excellent opportunity to fuel what we were already doing.”

    Lester, who will work directly with the students participating in the program, said that this program is the first of its kind at KSU to focus on students already enrolled. Previously, they have focused only on recruiting students.

    “From a social point of view, (the program) provides well-prepared and capable students who can go out and do the good works of the university,” he said. “(LSAMP) provides (the school) with a vehicle to make sure that our students are the best they can be and do the work that’s expected of them.”

    The Peach State LSAMP is a collaborative effort to increase the number of under-represented minority students statewide who complete undergraduate degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

    “Minorities are not entering the science professions in higher numbers,” Lester said. “It’s almost as though we have this significant component of the population that is being left behind. We’re trying to make sure that everyone who is capable can contribute maximally.”

    As a new LSAMP member, KSU recently conducted its first “Lab Coat Ceremony” for 25 undergraduate science and math students in the College of Science and Mathematics.

    These students, who range from freshmen to seniors, are pursuing science and math degrees as part of the program.

    In addition to KSU, the LSAMP alliance consists of seven institutions with the University of Georgia serving as the lead institution. Other members include Fort Valley State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Perimeter College, Savannah State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

    Copyright 2011 The Marietta Daily Journal. All rights reserved.

    © mdjonline.com 2011

     

    KSU tries to recruit minority students to science programs

    by Lindsay Field
    lfield@cherokeetribune.com Cherokee Tribune

    10.28.11 - 11:59 pm

    KENNESAW — Kennesaw State University is encouraging minority students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the school, the school said Friday.

    KSU has become the most recent Georgia college to join the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

    There are 8,135 minorities enrolled at the school, approximately 34 percent of the student population.

    Peach State LSAMP provides services such as academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, research opportunities and summer bridge programs. Students at the college are recruited into the program by Dr. Army Lester and his colleagues at KSU.

    “We’ve seen the need and we’ve been addressing the need in a number of different ways over the years,” said Lester, a biology professor at KSU. “This is an excellent opportunity to fuel what we were already doing.”

    Lester, who will work directly with the students participating in the program, said that this program is the first of its kind at KSU to focus on students already enrolled. Previously, the university focused only on recruiting students.

    “From a social point of view, (the program) provides well-prepared and capable students who can go out and do the good works of the university,” he said. “(LSAMP) provides (the school) with a vehicle to make sure that our students are the best they can be and do the work that’s expected of them.”

    The Peach State LSAMP is a collaborative effort to increase the number of under-represented minority students statewide who complete undergraduate degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

    “Minorities are not entering the science professions in higher numbers,” Lester said. “It’s almost as though we have this significant component of the population that is being left behind. We’re trying to make sure that everyone who is capable can contribute maximally.”

    As a new LSAMP member, KSU recently conducted its first “Lab Coat Ceremony” for 25 undergraduate science and math students in the College of Science and Mathematics.

    These students, who range from freshmen to seniors, are pursuing science and math degrees as part of the program.

    In addition to KSU, the LSAMP alliance consists of seven institutions with the University of Georgia serving as the lead institution. Other members include Fort Valley State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Perimeter College, Savannah State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

    Copyright 2011 Cherokee Tribune. All rights reserved.

    © cherokeetribune.com 2011

    5 Metro Atlanta colleges join organization to increase minority STEM majors

    Submitted by Beth Sawicki, Where U Live Producer

    Friday, October 28th, 2011, 1:29pm

    Topics: Schools

    PrintE-mail

    ATHENS, Ga. -- Seven colleges and universities in Georgia are making strides toward increasing the numbers of minority students interested in STEM disciplines.

    The schools are part of an organization known as the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation(LSAMP), a collaborative effort to reach underrepresented minorities and encourage them to pursue majors and careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

    The University of Georgia is the lead institution for Peach State LSAMP. Four more of the schools are in Metro Atlanta: Georgia Tech, Georgia Perimeter College, Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

    Other participating institutions include Ft. Valley State University near Warner Robins, and Savannah State University.

    "This country desperately needs more talented young men and women pursuing the STEM disciplines if we are going to successfully compete in the new global trade arena," said Ron Matson, dean of Kennesaw State's College of Science and Mathematics.

    With a student focus in mind, each participating school provides services that assist with the transition from high school to college, integrate minorities into the academic environment, and interest them in research and internship opportunities in the STEM fields. Peach State LSAMP creates academic enrichment, financial support, and peer and faculty mentoring, all with the goal of interesting more students in subjects that will greatly benefit them, as well as society, in the future.

    Topics: Schools

    KSU Lab Coat Ceremony for Minority Students

    Name of Publication: 
    Kennesaw Patch
    Excerpt of Article: 

  • October 5, 2011
  • Friday, Kennesaw State University conducted its first Lab Coat Ceremony for 25 minority undergraduate science students in the College of Science and Mathematics.

    The students, who range from freshmen to seniors, are pursuing science degrees as part of the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines. Dean Ron Matson and Biology Professor Army Lester III presided over the ceremony.

    The students include: Parris Tanksley, Chinelo Onyeka, Mahogany Morgan, Bianca Mondesir, Lauren Hutchinson, Ebonee Harris, Jaleesa Griner, Camery Green, Reesheda Gilbert, Chioma Enweano, Ariell Durden, Iesha Dawson, Brittani Brown, Rayana Braich, Deborah Adedeji, Cleonecia Forbes, Feiruz Atta, Cristian Acero, Ezigbo Umejiego, Raymond Akinnawo, Isatou Jawara, Lisley Garcia, Angle Foster, Akindele James Aluko and Vladimir Moricette.

    • School: Kennesaw State University

      • Award: Lab Coat Ceremony

    Kennesaw State University breaks ground on $21 million science lab addition

    Ground Breaking dc 2190-28.jpg

    Kennesaw State University breaks ground on $21 million science lab addition

    Construction of 5-story, state-of-the-art facility will support program expansion

    To access downloadable information and photos, click here.

     

    KENNESAW, Ga. – (March 18, 2011) — Kennesaw State University broke ground today on a new facility dedicated entirely to scientific teaching and research. The $21 million KSU Science Lab Addition will enable the university to expand course offerings and increase research opportunities for students and faculty.

    “The KSU Science Lab Addition is vital to the success of our College of Science and Mathematics, which is quickly becoming one of Georgia’s outstanding science institutions,” said KSU President Daniel S. Papp. “The research and learning opportunities this will provide for our faculty and students will help catapult us into the national arena as a major contributor in biological, chemical and biotechnology research,” Papp stated.

    The five-story, approximately 73,000-square-foot facility, which will connect with the existing science building, will contain high-tech biology and chemistry labs, plus faculty and administrative offices and an atrium.

    Additionally, the building will have ample space to accommodate specific teaching and research needs. For example, one floor will be dedicated to teaching labs, while another two floors will be for labs designed especially for faculty and graduate research.

    “The prospect of having the necessary laboratory space we need to expand research that will open new doors for our students and faculty has the entire College of Science and Mathematics buzzing,” said Ronald H. Matson, interim dean of the College of Science and Mathematics. “Also, the reaction to the architectural renderings from our students, alumni, faculty and staff has been phenomenal.”

     It is projected that Georgia will add more than 18,600 new jobs over the next six years in the sciences and technology.

    In the past, the lack of lab space has severely limited KSU’s ability to offer specialized courses in areas to support the state’s pharmaceutical and biomedical industries — a strong area of emphasis for KSU. In addition, the new lab will enable the college to expand its master’s offerings with two anticipated degrees in integrative biology and chemical sciences.

    “This new science lab facility will also enable us to provide an environment of effective collaboration and the academic components necessary for future flexibility within our programs,” added Matson.

    The architectural firm of Perkins + Will designed the project, which is expected to achieve Gold LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) certification. The building will be constructed by Choate Construction Company over the next 18 months.  

    KSU’s College of Science and Mathematics consists of the departments of biology and physics, chemistry and biochemistry, computer science and information systems, and mathematics and statistics. In 2010, college faculty brought in $1.88 million dollars of external grants including several from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Some of the projects funded by these awards center around providing a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms associated with human health and diseases.

     

    # # #

     

    KennesawState University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering more than 70 graduate and undergraduate degrees, including doctorates in education, business and nursing, and a new Ph.D. in international conflict management. A member of the 35-unit University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive, residential institution with a growing population of more than 23,400 students from 142 countries.

     

     

    Contact: Robert S. Godlewski, rgodlews@kennesaw.edu, 770-499-3448

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