science

Chip off the block - Father, son to receive diplomas together at KSU commencement

Name of Publication: 
The Marietta Daily Journal
Excerpt of Article: 

by Rachel Gray

May 12, 2014 04:00 AM
Gage Doss, left, and his father, Greg Doss, stand together at Sprayberry High School, where Greg teaches. Both father and son are set to receive diplomas together at Kennesaw State University Tuesday. Greg will obtain his Ph.D. while Gage will receive a degree in statistics. Staff/Jeff Stanton
Gage Doss, left, and his father, Greg Doss, stand together at Sprayberry High School, where Greg teaches. Both father and son are set to receive diplomas together at Kennesaw State University Tuesday. Greg will obtain his Ph.D. while Gage will receive a degree in statistics. Staff/Jeff Stanton
 
 

KENNESAW — A father and son who share a passion for numbers and science joined together on their final academic projects in order to graduate on the same day from Kennesaw State University.

Greg Doss, 53, and his son, Gage Doss, 24, of Cartersville, will each receive diplomas during the evening commencement ceremony Tuesday.

On May 13 and 14, almost 2,200 graduates will walk across the stage at the KSU Convocation Center.

“To be honest, I thought it was a novelty for us to walk together,” Greg Doss said. “Not only do I get to watch (my son) walk across the stage, I get to participate with him.”

Robert S. Godlewski, a spokesperson with the University Relations department at KSU, said although the college cannot confirm this is the first father-son dual graduation from the school on the same day, it is a very rare and unique happening.

“We have not been able to pin down any such occurrence in the last 50 years,” Godlewski said.

Greg Doss, who has been an engineering, drawing and design teacher at Sprayberry High School in Marietta for seven years, said he treats his students like adult engineers, allowing them to explore their own ideas and concepts.

“They never cease to amaze me,” Greg Doss said.

Greg Doss calls the students “amazing” and very “inspirational,” but is providing his own inspiration as an example of a man who has never stopped pursuing higher education.

When he graduates, Greg Doss will become the first doctoral student in the Bagwell College of Education to receive a degree in the educational leadership concentration.

The doctorate will make Greg Doss a triple alumnus, with an undergrad degree in secondary mathematics education and a master’s degree in educational leadership, both from KSU.

Gage Doss said he has always found working with numbers appealing because the field is logic based and structured. “I had an affinity towards math since I was very little,” he said. “It makes more sense to me than any other subject.”

Although it is easy to say “like father, like son,” Greg Doss said his son is “far more advanced than me.”

“He has already far surpassed my knowledge base in mathematics,” Greg Doss said.

This advanced knowledge was a great help to Greg Doss, who asked his son to “provide the heavy number crunching” for his dissertation. The team used data from local school districts to compare the number of teachers and academic leaders represented from the baby boomer, Generation X and millennial generations.

Greg Doss said he does not have any firm plans to go back to school again.

When asked by his wife, Kim, what he plans to do next, Greg Doss said he responded, “I don’t know, but I am looking for my next learning opportunity.”

Both father and son say it was Kim who has stood behind both of them the whole time. And lucky for her, Greg Doss said, she will only have to attend one graduation ceremony.

Read more: The Marietta Daily Journal - Chip off the block Father son to receive diplomas together at KSU commencement

Kennesaw State, NASA promote STEM education in girls

Name of Publication: 
Examiner.com
Excerpt of Article: 

The growth of women entering highly competitive fields in science and technology are forcing some colleges and universities to look to the preteens of today for the jobs of the next decade. A group of sixth graders attended a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) educational workshop hosted by Kennesaw State University on Monday as the school looks to inspire girls interested in STEM-related fields. One of NASA's educator-astronauts was in attendance to help motivate and give advice to over two-hundred students from across north Georgia. Read more about Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger's visit to KSU on Examiner.com.

Atlanta Science Fair at Kennesaw State University

Name of Publication: 
Atlanta Journal Constitution
Excerpt of Article: 

Kn

Aiming for the stars

Name of Publication: 
Marietta Daily Journal
Excerpt of Article: 
 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronaut Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger speaks to a group of middle school girls, including students from J.J. Daniell Middle School, as a part of the Girls’ Adventures in STEM
(science, technology, engineering and math) workshop at Kennesaw State University’s on Monday. Metcalf-Lindenburger spoke about her experiences as an astronaut and her time aboard the International Space Station.

Kennesaw State University Professor Teaches Chemistry in Puerto Vallarta

Name of Publication: 
VirtualVallarta.com
Excerpt of Article: 
a-chemistry
 

Published Mar 21, 2012, 1:03pm

This winter, Professor Laurence Peterson has been teaching high school chemistry at the American School in Puerto Vallarta (ASPV) while on a leave of absence from his full-time teaching at Kennesaw State University (Atlanta, GA). Under the auspices of the Science Coaches program sponsored by the American Chemical Society (ACS), Peterson has been teaching one day each week along side ASPV’s chemistry teacher, Adam Kilner.

Peterson has brought into the classroom some of his practical experience in the chemical industry to enable the 24 junior level students taking chemistry to understand how chemistry impacts their everyday life.

The students at ASPV have learned about the use of bromine compounds to fire-retard plastics, the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn, the availability of “green” polyesters to make plastic beverage bottles based upon poly lactic acid that readily biodegrade in the environment as well as the adverse implications from the human consumption of ethanol-containing beverages. The latter subject was taught using an online, freely-available case study from Chemcases.com developed by funding from the National Science Foundation and designed to teach both the chemistry of alcohols as well as their physiological effects.

The Science Coaches program sponsored by the ACS is designed to bring experienced teachers from academia and industry into the high school classroom to help make chemistry more interesting and relevant as well as attract more students into STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers. The ACS provides grants for equipment and supplies to participating schools while teachers like Peterson donate their time to help bridge the gap between theory and practice in science education that are worldwide concerns.

Source: Arturo Romero

 

Kennesaw State joins group to boost minority enrollment

Name of Publication: 
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Excerpt of Article: 

 

    By Laura Diamond

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    12:21 p.m. Friday, October 28, 2011

    Kennesaw State University announced Friday that it joined a statewide push to increase the number of minority students who earn degrees in math, science, technology and engineering.

    Other Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation members are: University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Georgia Perimeter College, Southern Polytechnic State, Ft. Valley State and Savannah State universities.

    The group is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and provides students with mentors, research opportunities and financial aid.

    Find this article at:

    http://www.ajc.com/news/cobb/kennesaw-state-joins-group-1212045.html

    Please see additional coverage below:

    Kennesaw State works to recruit more minority students

    Atlanta Business Chronicle by Carla Caldwell, Morning Call Editor

    Date: Monday, October 31, 2011, 7:08am EDT

    Kennesaw State Universityofficials want more minority students to attend the Cobb County, Ga., school’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs, reports the Marietta Daily Journal.

    KSU is the latest Georgia college to join the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

    Peach State LSAMP provides services including academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, research opportunities and summer bridge programs.

    There are 8,135 minorities enrolled at KSU, approximately 34 percent of the student population, the Marietta newspaper reported.

    KSU trying to recruit more minority students to science programs

    by Lindsay Field
    lfield@mdjonline.com The Marietta Daily Journal

    10.28.11 - 11:59 pm

    By Lindsay Field

    lfield@mdjonline.com

    KENNESAW — Kennesaw State University is encouraging minority students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the school, the school said Friday.

    KSU has become the most recent Georgia college to join the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

    There are 8,135 minorities enrolled at the school, approximately 34 percent of the students population.

    Peach State LSAMP provides services such as academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, research opportunities and summer bridge programs. Students at the college are recruited into the program by Dr. Army Lester and his colleagues at KSU.

    “We’ve seen the need and we’ve been addressing the need in a number of different ways over the years,” said Lester, a biology professor at KSU. “This is an excellent opportunity to fuel what we were already doing.”

    Lester, who will work directly with the students participating in the program, said that this program is the first of its kind at KSU to focus on students already enrolled. Previously, they have focused only on recruiting students.

    “From a social point of view, (the program) provides well-prepared and capable students who can go out and do the good works of the university,” he said. “(LSAMP) provides (the school) with a vehicle to make sure that our students are the best they can be and do the work that’s expected of them.”

    The Peach State LSAMP is a collaborative effort to increase the number of under-represented minority students statewide who complete undergraduate degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

    “Minorities are not entering the science professions in higher numbers,” Lester said. “It’s almost as though we have this significant component of the population that is being left behind. We’re trying to make sure that everyone who is capable can contribute maximally.”

    As a new LSAMP member, KSU recently conducted its first “Lab Coat Ceremony” for 25 undergraduate science and math students in the College of Science and Mathematics.

    These students, who range from freshmen to seniors, are pursuing science and math degrees as part of the program.

    In addition to KSU, the LSAMP alliance consists of seven institutions with the University of Georgia serving as the lead institution. Other members include Fort Valley State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Perimeter College, Savannah State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

    Copyright 2011 The Marietta Daily Journal. All rights reserved.

    © mdjonline.com 2011

     

    KSU tries to recruit minority students to science programs

    by Lindsay Field
    lfield@cherokeetribune.com Cherokee Tribune

    10.28.11 - 11:59 pm

    KENNESAW — Kennesaw State University is encouraging minority students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the school, the school said Friday.

    KSU has become the most recent Georgia college to join the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

    There are 8,135 minorities enrolled at the school, approximately 34 percent of the student population.

    Peach State LSAMP provides services such as academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, research opportunities and summer bridge programs. Students at the college are recruited into the program by Dr. Army Lester and his colleagues at KSU.

    “We’ve seen the need and we’ve been addressing the need in a number of different ways over the years,” said Lester, a biology professor at KSU. “This is an excellent opportunity to fuel what we were already doing.”

    Lester, who will work directly with the students participating in the program, said that this program is the first of its kind at KSU to focus on students already enrolled. Previously, the university focused only on recruiting students.

    “From a social point of view, (the program) provides well-prepared and capable students who can go out and do the good works of the university,” he said. “(LSAMP) provides (the school) with a vehicle to make sure that our students are the best they can be and do the work that’s expected of them.”

    The Peach State LSAMP is a collaborative effort to increase the number of under-represented minority students statewide who complete undergraduate degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

    “Minorities are not entering the science professions in higher numbers,” Lester said. “It’s almost as though we have this significant component of the population that is being left behind. We’re trying to make sure that everyone who is capable can contribute maximally.”

    As a new LSAMP member, KSU recently conducted its first “Lab Coat Ceremony” for 25 undergraduate science and math students in the College of Science and Mathematics.

    These students, who range from freshmen to seniors, are pursuing science and math degrees as part of the program.

    In addition to KSU, the LSAMP alliance consists of seven institutions with the University of Georgia serving as the lead institution. Other members include Fort Valley State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Perimeter College, Savannah State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

    Copyright 2011 Cherokee Tribune. All rights reserved.

    © cherokeetribune.com 2011

    5 Metro Atlanta colleges join organization to increase minority STEM majors

    Submitted by Beth Sawicki, Where U Live Producer

    Friday, October 28th, 2011, 1:29pm

    Topics: Schools

    PrintE-mail

    ATHENS, Ga. -- Seven colleges and universities in Georgia are making strides toward increasing the numbers of minority students interested in STEM disciplines.

    The schools are part of an organization known as the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation(LSAMP), a collaborative effort to reach underrepresented minorities and encourage them to pursue majors and careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

    The University of Georgia is the lead institution for Peach State LSAMP. Four more of the schools are in Metro Atlanta: Georgia Tech, Georgia Perimeter College, Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University.

    Other participating institutions include Ft. Valley State University near Warner Robins, and Savannah State University.

    "This country desperately needs more talented young men and women pursuing the STEM disciplines if we are going to successfully compete in the new global trade arena," said Ron Matson, dean of Kennesaw State's College of Science and Mathematics.

    With a student focus in mind, each participating school provides services that assist with the transition from high school to college, integrate minorities into the academic environment, and interest them in research and internship opportunities in the STEM fields. Peach State LSAMP creates academic enrichment, financial support, and peer and faculty mentoring, all with the goal of interesting more students in subjects that will greatly benefit them, as well as society, in the future.

    Topics: Schools

    University recruiting science professionals for teaching program

    Name of Publication: 
    The Marietta Daily Journal
    Excerpt of Article: 
    University recruiting science professionals for teaching program
    by Marcus E. Howard
    mhoward@mdjonline.com
    October 06, 2011 10:39 PM | 364 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
     
     

    KENNESAW — If you have a degree in science, engineering or technology and are considering a teaching career, Kennesaw State University is looking for you.

    The university’s new program, called the I-IMPACT Noyce II, is designed to draw and mentor talented science professionals to teach STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects in public schools.

    KSU has created two Robert Noyce Scholarship programs designed to recruit and retain teachers. The programs are specially designed for STEM professionals looking to become secondary physics or chemistry teachers, and current teachers looking to further develop as teacher-leaders.

    “The purpose is two-fold. One is to increase the number of highly qualified chemistry and physics teachers teaching at the secondary level in our state, and along with that is to develop a stronger pipeline from the science and math professions into teaching as second careers,” said Dr. Greg Rushton, director of the I-IMPACT program.

    “The second purpose would be to develop teacher-leaders out of existing chemistry and physics teachers.”

    The teaching fellows track is for people who are employed or have been employed as professionals in STEM fields and who are interested in the 14-month master of arts in teaching program for physics and chemistry at KSU. They must hold an undergraduate degree in a STEM field and have worked in a STEM field.

    The master teaching fellows track is aimed at experienced physics and chemistry teachers who are interested in a professional development. Participants must be invited to submit their applications by school and district STEM supervisors. They’re also required to commit to teach for four to five years in a high needs school system.

    The master teaching fellows will be selected from public school districts in Cobb, Atlanta, Gwinnett, DeKalb and Paulding counties, Rushton said.

    “We’re hoping that they’ll go back into one of these partner districts,” he said. “Those two (teaching tracks) will hopefully interact to a large extent.”

    Participants in both programs receive $10,000 annual stipends during the five-year program, which includes a professional development period. Additional money is available for graduate tuition, professional development, memberships in professional organizations, travel and classroom supplies.

    The program is made possible by a $2.84 million grant received last fall from the National Science Foundation and $1.4 million in matching funds from KSU.

    Recruiting for the program is going on now, and the 16 students who are selected (eight from each teaching track) will begin studying in January.

    “In Georgia, there is a tremendous need for teachers in general, but particularly for STEM professionals,” said Nancy Overley, program manger. “Overall, the universities and colleges are stating that, of the top-five needs in the schools, first is physics teachers and the third is chemistry teachers.”

    For more I-IMPACT information, e-mail iimpact@kennesaw.edu. The application is online at www.GANoyceScholars.org.
     

    Read more: The Marietta Daily Journal - University recruiting science professionals for teaching program

    Dinner at Depot, Lab Coats, Athletes

    Name of Publication: 
    Kennesaw Patch
    Excerpt of Article: 

    By Donna Espy-Rypel

    ... Today at noon, Kennesaw State University is conducting a “Lab Coat Ceremony” for 25 minority undergraduate science students in the College of Science and Mathematics. The students range from freshmen to seniors who are pursuing degrees in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines. Their individual research advisors will present them with their lab coats.

    The Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation is a collaborative effort sustained by a coalition of five colleges and universities in Georgia to significantly increase the number of underrepresented minority students statewide who complete undergraduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. ...

    Program helping spawn unlikely science scholars

    Name of Publication: 
    Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Excerpt of Article: 

    There in a science class, wearing a white lab coat and cutting open a sheep heart, Jessie Vincoli remembered what it was she really wanted to do with her life.

    The 16-year-old had given up earlier ambitions of being a cardiac surgeon or a cardiac nurse like her mom. She flunked the 10th grade at Cobb County’s Harrison High School and bombed her physics course – twiBut this year, Jessie enrolled at the Cobb Performance Learning Center, a non-conventional school for students who want to graduate but haven't been successful in traditional high school. She was one of 11 from the center picked to participate this semester in the Kennesaw Science Program, where students visit the university and work with undergraduates on hands-on science experiments.

    Now, Jessie is acing her science courses and once again considering a career in medicine.

    “I thought if I did go to college it would be for a little while, I probably wouldn’t finish, I would end up failing,” she said. “I guess it’s the feeling of success: You feel motivated to do something with your life.”

    Syndicate content